Wednesday, June 22, 2016

The Play-by-Play Interview Tips

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Regardless of the type of interview being conducted, you should go into a prospective interview with a plan. You should build your plan around three key attributes you must communicate to effectively convince the interviewer you are a good fit for their position. After you identify these attributes, it is helpful to think of an interview as a term paper comprised of an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.  Your key attributes are your thesis.

The First 5 Minutes - Introduction

Like the introduction to a paper, an introduction to an interview is critical. During the first five minutes, you will set the tone for your interview. Make a good first impression. Look sharp and present a professional image. Relax, smile, and remember your plan. Your resume got your foot in the door; now you must effectively show the interviewer why you are an ideal fit for the position.

The Next 30 Minutes (The Body)

During the body of your interview, for about 20-30 minutes, the interviewer will typically ask you a series of questions focusing on your qualifications. Some questions are behavioral (looking for specific examples when you demonstrated a particular behavior); others may be company oriented to get a feel of how much you know about the position and industry. Your answers should highlight your qualifications, personality, and interest in the position.

Wrapping it Up (The Conclusion)

You have just completed answering a series of questions focusing on your qualifications, and now it is time to wrap up the interview. At this point, the interviewer is going to give you the opportunity to ask some questions. You must ask questions. Questions equal interest in the minds of an interviewer, and are a critical component of your interview. Formulate three to five well-thought-out questions that show that you are prepared, demonstrate genuine interest in the position, and set you up for your close.

Closing the Interview

"The Close" is a term used to describe the process of gaining some form of commitment from the prospective customer. In this case, the interviewer is the customer. By paying attention and asking the appropriate questions, you should uncover the employer's needs. Focus on those needs during your close, and emphasize how you can meet them.

For more transition tips and information visit our Transition Corner or contact an Orion Recruiter to see how we can help you!

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